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Persephone & Me by Corinne Desjardins

Published January 21, 2016 by admin

Persephone and Me Banner

It’s time to take a look at another new release! Come on, those who know my Jung kick, love of mythological archetypes, and such should know that I’d be all over this book. I also have a special love for Persephone, poetry, and creative nonfiction in general, so as soon as I saw the title, I was all in.

We’re talking to author Corinne Desjardins today, but first, let’s take a look at her book Persephone & Me.

Persephone and Me

Title:  Persephone & Me

Author:   Corinne Desjardins

Published:  December 10th, 2013

Genre:  Women’s Poetry

Recommended Age:  16+

Synopsis:

A poetry collection following my youthful fascination with Persephone and how she came to haunt me. I saw her constellation of characters within my own family and my own life. Ultimately, describing what I learned from the goddess.

Amazon | GoodReads

Read FREE with Kindle Unlimited!

Grace

SJ: Every writer has some sort of process. Give us a glimpse into yours. Do you meticulously outline? Do you write depending on what calls are out there?

CD: I write poetry as a means of reflecting and processing, so I happened to have a bunch of poems that just seemed to fall naturally into the structure.  I have outlined two other projects, started them both, and then deviated from said outlines.

SJ: Bonus question – Do you put on a cape and do a chant before hunkering down to work? Sacrifice anything? Along with your process, what’s your quirkiest writing habit?

CD: I wish I had a cape!  That would be so cool.  Mine would be a warm red, like Little Red Riding Hood!

I did stop watching an entertaining TV series a few years ago, and I haven’t looked back.

SJ: Are you a meticulous planner or do you believe in the muse? Where do your ideas come from? Do they filter in through your dreams? Do they show up at inopportune times and whap you upside the head? Do they result in a shady deal with a dark power?

CD: I am not a planner at heart, I’ve only learnt to do some amount of planning for basic time management.  I often get random ideas from some quirk of television or some other thing. I suppose I do have some shady deal with my personal Hades, since I tasted the pomegranate seeds of marriage.  But I have come to understand Hades as not evil, just misunderstood (and socially challenged due to his lack of interaction with people of life.)

SJ: If you could only write one genre ever again upon pain of being sacrificed to Cthulhu, what would it be and why?

CD: ChickLit, because ultimately I don’t want to be depressed.  And ChickLit is always funny.  It’s important to celebrate the humor in life.

SJ: What’s your biggest frustration as a writer? What do you consider the downside, or is there one? Is there any cliché that makes you want to wring people’s necks?

CD: Time. There just doesn’t ever seem to be enough time, or the writing/editing process just takes so much longer than anticipated.  Writing a novel in 30 days, a compellingly good novel, just isn’t feasible.  Don’t get me wrong, I applaud NaNoWriMo, but I have never actually completed a novel during November, because, Life Happens.  I have had much more success with Camp NaNoWriMo in other months, choosing my own genre and word count goal.

SJ: If you had to be stuck in one of your own books/stories for the rest of your life, what would it be and why? If you had to stick a loved one in one of your own books, what would it be and why? An enemy?

CD: I am already kind of stuck in this book, being that it’s the creative non-fiction version of my life!  I wouldn’t want to be stuck in the Black section, however, that would be depressing. I might put an enemy in there, though.  It does kind of feel like a dungeon.  Maybe they can learn from their time there.

SJ: Do you think it’s possible to develop a sure-fire recipe/formula for success as a writer? Would you want to, or does that compromise the art or the fun of it?

CD: I think the best stories are ones with a character arc of personal development and growth. There are different ways of highlighting this arc: hero’s journey, literary alchemy, the Pyramid, it’s all good.

SJ: Everyone has words of wisdom for young writers, so I’m not going to ask you about that. With a few unknown writers becoming success stories, a lot of people seem to think it’s an easy career choice. What would your words of wisdom be to these people?

CD: It’s not easy.  Mostly I write because I have to.  I’m not doing it for the money.  And I do hope that my story resonates with other women, and maybe they may become inspired to write their own stories, too.

SJ: It seems like everyone likes to gang up on certain genres as being inferior, less meaningful, or cheap entertainment (especially if it’s speculative in nature). Make a case for the genre you write.

CD: Creative Non-Fiction allows for therapeutic reflection and invites a new perspective or framework of understanding.  It’s healing. Poetry evokes the soul, of both the writer and the reader. It’s a mystical connection which we all crave.

SJ: What do you want people to instantly think of when they hear your name or your work mentioned?

CD: “That’s the book that made me consider my own life story, and made me realize that I could write my own book!”

SJ: Please tell us about your latest/favorite work or a little bit about what you’re working on right now. It’s plug time, so go for it!

CD:  I’m working on a novel called The Persephone Connection- it will be indirectly related to Persephone & Me in that the archetypes interact.  It is the second in this non-linear trilogy. This is taking a long time, it may be out sometime next year.

Perceiving Red

About the Author:

I am a writer. I love stories. I love to read. I love to write. Also love coffee, chocolate, and Merlot.

Amazon Author Page | Twitter | GoodReads | Blog

Excerpt: Holly and Ivy (a holiday faerie story)

Published December 23, 2014 by admin

I thought I’d include another little bit of Holly and Ivy…this bit is closer to Christmas, and shows how Holly’s luck begins to turn around (as she forgets the other part of the bargain and the price that might be paid).

***

Whether it was because of Ivy’s gift or the upturn in my mood, things
happened quickly after that. I found a pleasant job at a florist shop and rented a small
house closer to town so I could cut down on the commute and be less of a strain on the
folks. I visited and came to the pine trees as often as I could, but was careful to never
explain to Ivy about the new job. I was close to nature, but not in a way she would
have understood or liked.

As the weeks passed I found more excuses to stay away. My anal-retentive
capabilities were needed to revamp the inventory at work, I was trying to get moved
in and truly settled, and I was actually making an effort to get out and enjoy my life.
The running around with Ivy and the summer work on the farm had begun to slim
and streamline my body. I was still getting used to the looks my curves would get
every once in a while. That slow infusion of confidence convinced me to take a little
more pride in the rest of my appearance, which only served to make things just a little
easier. My coworkers were not taking no for an answer, so I found myself hanging out
in the evenings with people my own age instead of stopping by my folks’ place after
work. Instead of dreading those social interactions, I began to look forward to
conversation with friends who were going through the same frustrations and
heartaches I was. It was almost like we were all starting to come out on the other side.
Ivy was lovely, but the more I was subjected to adult conversation the more I realized
how much I’d missed it.
Leaves turned and the time for pumpkins came and passed into chillier
temperatures, turkey decorations on store windows, and holiday specials on
television. I was so busy with extended hours at work and trying to keep up with all
the extra chores that came with Christmas, that my parents had insisted I not even
think about trying to help them out with their own holiday ventures. As sad as I was
to not jump back into the post-Thanksgiving traditions during my first winter back
home, I was exhausted and grateful for the out.
Despite the full schedule, life was good. I knew very well who I owed that to,
but I was still uncomfortable admitting that all my good fortune was because of a
trinket and not my own efforts. I kept telling myself I had to go down to the farm and
make sure Ivy was safe for the winter, but it kept getting shoved to the bottom of my
to-do list. Besides, we’d made sure her new tree was at the very back of the lot. She
was sure to be okay if I put it off for a few days. Everything was falling into place so
easily: the house, the job, and when I literally bumped into my future husband while
rushing to my car after work one night…well, it’s easy to forget promises when your
life is full.
As much as I’d refused to believe in love at first sight, there’s no way to deny
the instant jolt I felt when I looked up into his green eyes, and I’m fairly sure that
wasn’t just because I’d plowed into him while trying to get out the door before the
next wave of orders came in. Tall and muscular, he brought to mind the old-school
romantic images of court knights, if a knight had to go questing for a Christmas
wreath in a parka and blue jeans. Vixen that I was, I reverted to my standard flirting
technique for attractive men I came across in daily life: I mumbled an apology and ran
away. For once, though, someone called my bluff.
“C’mon! The coat’s not that ugly!” His deep voice was full of humor and a hint
of self-deprecation.
I turned and glanced from him to my waiting clunker. As much as I wanted to
reply with something coy and witty, the cold air had frozen my tongue to the roof of
my mouth. “I…”
“You work here, right? I’ve seen you around before.” His friendly attempt at
conversation did nothing to stop my heart from trying to slam itself out of my chest.
I’d expected the same old reaction: for him to shrug and go on about his business. For
a minute it seemed that was exactly his plan of action, and then he turned back to call
after me as I shuffled down the snow-crusted sidewalk to my car. “I bet I know what
happened. Either you’re tongue’s frozen or you bit your tongue when I accidentally
body-checked you. How ’bout I get you a cup of coffee to make up for it?” His pine
green eyes sparkled hopefully under the ragtag fringe of auburn hair that jutted out
from under his beanie.

Despite my sudden shyness, I couldn’t help but laugh. “Don’t you need to get

something?” I asked and nodded toward the door I’d just exited.

The lumpy shoulders of his black coat moved up and down in a shrug.

“They’re extending their hours and you’re leaving for the day, right?” I nodded.

“Then the choice is obvious. Maybe later you can help me pick out a wreath that’ll
work for my shop’s door,” he added and pointed to the candy store across the street.
Cute, funny, and worked with chocolate…I was definitely a goner right from our first
impromptu date.

David was stable and motivated, while remaining small-town. He got the world
I came from and what I’d been through. He weathered my mood swings like a trooper
and always seemed to know when I needed him there with me. As cautious as I was
when we first started to see each other, I soon fell for his gentle nature and firm,
capable way of handling things. There were times he seemed to know exactly what I
needed from him. Maybe I just wanted to be with someone, but David felt right in a
way that Rob hadn’t. It was like he was an exact match for me, like he was heaven-sent
or delivered by a wishing star. He wasn’t put off by my situation or by the fact that I
was from a farming family. An avid hiker, he liked the fact that I’d grown up on the
land and appreciated nature.

My parents and friends were pleased, and if I’d had time to go talk to Ivy she
would have been ecstatic, I’m sure. It was proof that her magic talisman worked just
as well in human hands as it did for the Fair Folk. I didn’t know about that, but I also
didn’t take it out of the fireproof lock-box I’d hidden it in.

HollyAndIvy72dpi (1)

Amazon     Barnes and Noble   Mocha Memoirs Press Store

 holiday/fantasy

After losing her job and her boyfriend, Holly returns to her parents’ farm. Embarrassed and hopeless, she doesn’t expect to bump into a forgotten childhood friend that wasn’t supposed to exist. Ivy is not only a dryad, but she lives in the pine trees Holly’s family grows to sell at Christmas. As the old friends reconnect, Ivy not only shares her strong oninions, but gives Holly a charm that will change both their lives. As days melt into weeks and the seasons change, Holly’s life magically turns around. Christmas not only brings surprises, but a choice for the human woman. What’s more important: stability, success, and love, or keepinga promise to an old friend?

Holly and Ivy

Published December 6, 2014 by admin

So I do enjoy holiday fiction. I love reading it and I might, just MIGHT have a soft spot for Christmas chick lit and romances (Shut up. It’s December stress). I also love writing holiday fiction. Now, some of this can get…fascinating, especially the pieces that are in Lost in the Shadows. Candles is a story about a makeshift family surviving the zombie apocalypse and trying to stay sane while keeping Christmas Eve traditions alive. There’s also a story about reincarnation and astral travel that may involve the little drummer boy.

Compared to those, Holly and Ivy is pretty tame and normal. I actually got the idea from a writing prompt exercise in like August, though it’s also based on one of my favorite holiday songs and probably owes a little to Hans Christian Andersen in a really backwards way. The story took hold and wouldn’t let me go, though, and soon I had something unique (for me) and special. Not only does it incorporate the holiday feel I love to read about, but it also doesn’t shy away from the fact that sometimes unfortunate things happen during the holiday season. Some people are cynical or burnt out or whatever. Sometimes you need a little kick in the pants, a little magic to help you out.

Sometimes you need a friend who’s a dryad.

When Holly’s life falls apart, she moves back with her parents and has to fight through fear and lack of motivation. When she takes a walk out to the Christmas tree farm her family owns, she’s suddenly shoved face to face with the imaginary friend that isn’t so imaginary – the dryad Ivy. While Holly’s grown up and been burned by life, Ivy remains innocent and eager to cast humans in the role of ignorant murderers. Even she is concerned about her human friend, though, and offers Holly a trinket that could change everything for the thirty-something…but it will change the dryad’s own future, as well.

***

“What do I do with it?” I asked. I told myself I was just playing along, suspending reality to make Ivy feel better. Although if that was the case then perhaps I should have really examined the fact that Ivy was real and not me suspending reality to make myself feel better.

“You hold it now until it gets to know you. You keep it safe in your possession and it shall bring you ease and grace,” the tree sprite giggled.

“And that really works?” No matter how I tried I couldn’t hide my skepticism.

She turned up her pointed nose. “How else would I have survived so well with murderers on the loose? It’s worked for a good long while.” I raised an eyebrow as a sly grin spread just a little too far across her face to make the smile look human. “Do you remember when I snuck to school with that sapling you took for show and tell?”

The next smile didn’t hurt quite as much as I traced the delicate edge of the tiny plant with the pad of a finger. The petaled head shivered and softly brushed against my calluses.  “I thought everyone was going to have a heart attack when you burst out of the thing and started singing to everyone! Mrs. Robinson finally played it off as the whole class playing a trick on her. We had to go without milk time for a week.” I’d gotten in so much trouble with my parents for lying in school and saying that I had a magic plant. Given that I was adamant that I’d been telling the truth, it was a hell of an ordeal for a six-year-old.

“’Twas so much fun!” Ivy paused mid-pirouette. It was downright disgusting that she could hold the arabesque for so long and not even wobble or suffer a leg cramp. “Though I would not want to live in such cold halls all the time.” She paused and took a long breath, much longer than I or any other human could possibly inhale. Before my eyes her skin became greener, infused by the crisp clean air. “You need to be in the trees, Holly. Mortals refuse to understand that they must live where things grow. Now that you’re home, let’s play!” She leapt over my head and landed effortlessly beside her home tree, staring at me expectantly.

Maybe it was being back home or maybe it was just being back in the good fresh air, but her suggestion made me giddy. It suddenly sounded like the exact prescription I needed, the one thing I’d been missing through all those frustrating years. My fragile mind and heart demanded an escape. They couldn’t take any more disappointment, any more expectations or responsibility, and they especially couldn’t take any more reality. I nodded and tucked the strange clover deep in my pocket. The breeze had dried my tears and the heavenly scent of grass and pine put the sudden urge to run in my feet. Suddenly the heavy air and the blazing sun didn’t matter so much and my anxieties were willing to take a momentary backseat to the chance to goof off for an afternoon.  “Are you sure you’ll be okay?” I hesitated, hand still at my pocket.

Ivy flashed a bold grin and stretched up on her toes; her fingers wiggled over her head, making her resemble an odd, scrawny plant. “With you here? Of course! Just remember to come look after my tree when the murderers come around the winter harvest time. You can even help me choose which tree will be my final home so you’ll know where I’ll be.” The words were no sooner out of her mouth when she tore off, dodging branches and bark as quick and swift as a deer. I groaned as I pulled myself to my feet and tumbled after her, muscles screaming at the sudden exercise. Still, I found myself laughing the entire time

HollyAndIvy72dpi (1)

Amazon     Barnes and Noble   Mocha Memoirs Press Store

After losing her job and her boyfriend, Holly returns to her parents’ farm. Embarrassed and hopeless, she doesn’t expect to bump into a forgotten childhood friend that wasn’t supposed to exist. Ivy is not only a dryad, but she lives in the pine trees Holly’s family grows to sell at Christmas. As the old friends reconnect, Ivy not only shares her strong oninions, but gives Holly a charm that will change both their lives. As days melt into weeks and the seasons change, Holly’s life magically turns around. Christmas not only brings surprises, but a choice for the human woman. What’s more important: stability, success, and love, or keepinga promise to an old friend?

 

Jitterbug PR Presents: One year anniversary: Lessons Learned by Sydney Logan

Published September 6, 2013 by admin

LLOneYearAnniv

 

 

September 6 marks the one year anniversary of the release of Sydney Logan’s debut novel, Lessons Learned. To celebrate, Sydney is offering a fantastic giveaway!

 

Lessons_Learned_Final_Cover

A young girl needs to spread her wings, but a young woman needs roots. English teacher Sarah Bray never thought she’d return to Sycamore Falls, but a traumatic event at her inner-city school leaves her desperate for the sanctuary of home. By returning to her roots, an older and wiser Sarah hopes to deal with the demons of her present and confront the ghosts of her past. She discovers a kindred spirit in Lucas Miller, a teacher from New York with demons of his own. As the newest faculty members at Sycamore High School, they quickly become friends – bonding through Lucas’s culture shock and their mutual desire to build new lives. When they open their wounded hearts to each other, their friendship effortlessly evolves into romance. Their love is put to the test when Matt, the quarterback of the football team, shares his deepest secret with Sarah. When the conservative community finds out, Sarah and Lucas – along with the town of Sycamore Falls – are schooled in the lessons of acceptance, tolerance, and love.

Praise for Lessons Learned

“Lessons Learned is a book that isn’t easily forgotten. I urge you to give it a read. You won’t regret it. Also, did I mention it starts with a bang? Talk about the best prologue ever.” -JM Darhower, author of Sempre
“I haven’t read a book in a long time that I can compare to my favorite author Nicholas Sparks. THIS book is that book.” – Becky, Book Blogger

 

Sydney has graciously joined us today with a guest post, so let’s see what she has to say!

***

Why Am I An Author?

Guest Post by Sydney Logan

 

What made me want to be an author?  I don’t know that I ever made a decision to become an author. I’ve just always been a writer.

When I was a young girl, I would write short stories and song lyrics. English and writing were subjects that came very easily to me in high school, and I had considered majoring in journalism in college. Wanting to stay close to my hometown, I decided to become a teacher instead.

Still, I continued to write, but I had never considered publishing. About four years ago, I started posting stories online. One of my readers just happened to work for a small publishing house and suggested I submit an original story. I did, and I was signed to a contract not long after. I’ve now written two novels and three short stories. I’m currently working on my third novel, which will be released in 2014, and I plan to publish a Christmas short story this year on Amazon Kindle.

 

 Author Image

 

Sydney Logan is an Amazon bestselling author and holds a Master’s degree in Elementary
Education. With the 2012 release of her first novel, Lessons Learned, she made the transition
from bookworm to author. Sydney has a very unhealthy obsession with music, and her iPod is
filled with everything from Johnny Cash to Eminem. She is also the author of two short stories:
“Mistletoe Magic,” available exclusively on Amazon Kindle, and “Stupid Cupid,” which is
featured in the Romantic Interludescompilation. When she isn’t reading or writing, she enjoys
playing piano and relaxing on her front porch at her home in East Tennessee with her wonderful
husband and their very spoiled cat.
Her second novel, Mountain Charm, is slated for a summer 2013 release.

Website    TWCS PH    Goodreads     Facebook    Twitter

To thank her readers for an amazing year, Sydney is celebrating with a giveaway! You can win a signed copy of

Lessons Learned and a $25 Amazon or iTunes gift card! Good luck!

To enter the giveaway, click here!

This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, iTunes, or Blogger. We hereby release all names listed of any liability. Winner(s) will be contacted by email within 48 hours after the giveaway ends. Let me know if you have any questions or issues by contacting me: @SydneyALogan. – Good Luck!

Available Today: Mountain Charm by Sydney Logan

Published July 4, 2013 by admin

 

mountain charm banner

 

 

Today we’re taking a look at Mountain Charm by Sydney Logan, which is released today!

 

17731644

 

 

 

 

Amazon

At the age of thirteen, Angelina
Clark followed in the footsteps of her ancestors by casting an Appalachian love spell, which promised
she would blossom into a beautiful and gifted woman who would find her true love. A young Angelina
had been thrilled to participate in the sacred ritual, but through the years, her father’s untimely death
and her mother’s failing health have shaken Angelina’s magical faith to its core. As her twenty-first
birthday approaches, she refuses to practice her supernatural gifts and no longer believes in the love
charm.

That is, until Dylan Thomas arrives on her front porch.Dylan, a Nashville writer, travels to the mountain town of Maple Ridge to unearth the family’s
supernatural secrets. While her clairvoyant mother is convinced that Dylan is her daughter’s soul mate,
Angelina refuses to see the nosy reporter as anything more than a nuisance.
Despite their constant bickering, sparks fly.

Dylan admits he feels strangely drawn to Angelina and is in no hurry to leave Maple Ridge or publish his
magazine article. Fearful that his emotions are being influenced by the spell, a stubborn Angelina
struggles to fight her own budding attraction to the reporter.

The two inevitably grow closer just as her mother’s health begins to deteriorate, and Angelina is faced
with the possibility of selling the family’s music shop to pay the mounting medical expenses. Desperate
to help the woman he loves, Dylan explores his own family tree and finds support from an unlikely
source. Can he finally prove his love is real—spell or no spell?

A story filled with love, friendship, family, and just a hint of Appalachian magic, Mountain Charm will
leave you spellbound.

Author Image

Sydney Logan is an Amazon
bestselling author and holds a Master’s degree in Elementary Education. With the 2012 release of her
first novel, Lessons Learned, she made the transition from bookworm to author. Sydney has a very
unhealthy obsession with music, and her iPod is filled with everything from Johnny Cash to Eminem. She
is also the author of two short stories: “Mistletoe Magic,” available exclusively on Amazon Kindle, and
“Stupid Cupid,” which is featured in the Romantic Interludes compilation. When she isn’t reading or
writing, she enjoys playing piano and relaxing on her front porch at her home in East Tennessee with her
wonderful husband and their very spoiled cat.
Visit Sydney’s website at http://www.sydneylogan.com/

There’s also a giveaway going on where you could win a signed copy of Mountain Charm!

To get in on that, go HERE!

Sydney Logan: On Being a Writer (and Holding Your Tongue)

Published May 27, 2013 by admin

Today the lovely Sydney Logan has agreed to write a little something to keep everyone occupied and intrigued, and I’m very grateful to her for it! I love to get different people’s takes on the blessings and challenges of living a creative life. I feel it’s important for people to really understand what goes into this sort of lifestyle and the professions that go with it – both the high points and the frustrations. As you can tell, what she has to say definitely rings true for me and many others.

On Being a Writer

(and Holding Your Tongue)

Guest Post by Sydney Logan,

author of Lessons Learned and the upcoming Mountain Charm

 

Being a creative person can be a wonderful and therapeutic experience, giving you the chance to unleash your emotions in a variety of ways. Painters, musicians, and yes, even writers, sometimes turn to their craft to deal with their own inner feelings. Words and pictures can show happiness, depression, grief, and conflict. Is a painting always indicative of what’s going on in the painter’s head? Not always. But creative expression is meant to make you feel something.

Books are no different.

So, when an author tells a story, it can be hard to deal with the fact that some readers don’t enjoy it. And, sometimes, those readers are quite eager to tell you just how much they didn’t enjoy it. Constructive criticism can be and should be a wonderful thing. It helps you grow as a writer. But when a review isn’t constructive, it can sometimes make an author wonder if putting your words out there for everyone to pick apart is really what you want to do with your life.

Especially when you can’t defend your work.

There is an unwritten rule in publishing that when you put your words out there for the world to see, you no longer have a voice. You aren’t allowed to defend, discuss, or engage. If you do, you get lumped with the other authors who chose that route and now find themselves filed under the label “Bad Author Behavior.”

Fair? Not at all.

However, I understand it’s part of the gig. While I’ve been blessed with many wonderful reviews, there have been a few that have been less than constructive and very mean-spirited. Again, that’s part of the job. I accepted it when I signed my publishing deal.

So how do I hold my tongue?

I choose to focus on the constructive reviews. I focus on the kind remarks that make my day. And I say thank you to readers and reviewers who took the time to read my book and offer their constructive thoughts.

And then I vent to my husband.

Don’t let the negativity eat at you. Vent to someone. Your spouse. Partner. Editor. Friend. Or, write about it and then send it to the recycle bin. Deal with your emotions and then go right back to writing, because you have deadlines to meet and stories to tell.

After all, your readers are waiting for you. 

Author Image

 

Sydney Logan is an Amazon bestselling author and holds a Master’s degree in Elementary Education. With the 2012 release of her first novel, Lessons Learned, she made the transition from bookworm to author. Sydney has a very unhealthy obsession with music, and her iPod is filled with everything from Johnny Cash to Eminem. She is also the author of two short stories: “Mistletoe Magic,” available exclusively on Amazon Kindle, and “Stupid Cupid,” which is featured in the Romantic Interludescompilation. When she isn’t reading or writing, she enjoys playing piano and relaxing on her front porch at her home in East Tennessee with her wonderful husband and their very spoiled cat.

Her second novel, Mountain Charm, is slated for a summer 2013 release.

Links:

Website: http://www.sydneylogan.com

TWCS PH: http://ph.thewriterscoffeeshop.com/authors/detail/41

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5787300.Sydney_Logan

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SydneyLoganAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SydneyALogan

 13578440

 

A young girl needs to spread her wings, but a young woman needs roots.

English teacher Sarah Bray never thought she’d return to Sycamore Falls, but a traumatic event at her inner-city school leaves her desperate for the sanctuary of home. By returning to her roots, an older and wiser Sarah hopes to deal with the demons of her present and confront the ghosts of her past.

She discovers a kindred spirit in Lucas Miller, a teacher from New York with demons of his own. As the newest faculty members at Sycamore High School, they quickly become friends – bonding through Lucas’s culture shock and their mutual desire to build new lives. When they open their wounded hearts to each other, their friendship effortlessly evolves into romance.

Their love is put to the test when Matt, the quarterback of the football team, shares his deepest secret with Sarah. When the conservative community finds out, Sarah and Lucas – along with the town of Sycamore Falls – are schooled in the lessons of acceptance, tolerance, and love.

 

17731644

 

expected release date: July 4th 2013

“True love and sweet whispers, till death do us part;

Send someone to love my Appalachian heart.”

At the age of thirteen, Angelina Clark followed in the footsteps of her ancestors by casting an Appalachian love spell, which promised she would blossom into a beautiful and gifted woman who would find her true love. A young Angelina had been thrilled to participate in the sacred ritual, but through the years, her father’s untimely death and her mother’s failing health have shaken Angelina’s magical faith to its core. As her twenty-first birthday approaches, she refuses to practice her supernatural gifts and no longer believes in the love charm.

That is, until Dylan Thomas arrives on her front porch.

Dylan, a Nashville writer, travels to the mountain town of Maple Ridge to unearth the family’s supernatural secrets. While her clairvoyant mother is convinced that Dylan is her daughter’s soul mate, Angelina refuses to see the nosy reporter as anything more than a nuisance.

Despite their constant bickering, sparks fly.

Dylan admits he feels strangely drawn to Angelina and is in no hurry to leave Maple Ridge or publish his magazine article. Fearful that his emotions are being influenced by the spell, a stubborn Angelina struggles to fight her own budding attraction to the reporter.

The two inevitably grow closer just as her mother’s health begins to deteriorate, and Angelina is faced with the possibility of selling the family’s music shop to pay the mounting medical expenses. Desperate to help the woman he loves, Dylan explores his own family tree and finds support from an unlikely source. Can he finally prove his love is real—spell or no spell?

A story filled with love, friendship, family, and just a hint of Appalachian magic, Mountain Charm will leave you spellbound

Blog Tour: The Guest Book by Andrea Hurst

Published March 10, 2013 by admin

 

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Today we continue with blog tour madness! This time it’s The Guest Book by Andrea Hurst. It’s amazing what randomly found objects can lead a person to do. Sometimes they’re just something to put away, yet sometimes we all stumble upon something life changing. Andrea is here today with an interview, but first let’s find out a little about her book!

 

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This book weaves together the heart of Nicholas Sparks, the romance of Nora Roberts, and the charm of Debbie Macomber.

Fleeing her picture-perfect marriage among the privileged set of Brentwood and the wreckage of a failed marriage, Lily Parkins decides to move to the only place that still holds happy memories, her grandmother’s old farmhouse. The lush and majestic setting of the Pacific Northwest calls to her and offers a place of refuge and perhaps renewal. Her grandmother has passed away, leaving the Madrona Island Bed & Breakfast Inn to Lily.

Left with only an old guestbook as her guide–a curious book full of letters, recipes, and glimpses into her family history–Lily is determined to embrace her newfound independence and recreate herself, one page at a time. With the help of the quirky island residents she has befriended, she slowly finds the strength to seek out happiness on her own terms. But as soon as she has sworn off men and is standing on her own two feet, Lily meets Ian, the alluring artist who lives next door, and her new life is suddenly thrown off course. The last thing she wants to do right now is to open her heart to another man.

Ultimately, Lily must decide if it’s worth giving up her soul for security or risking everything to follow her heart.

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SJ: Every writer has some sort of process. Give us a glimpse into yours. Do you meticulously outline? Do you write depending on what calls are out there?

AH: Pantster. Definitely. However, I do research and I always know the beginning and end, theme, and basic scenes. Either way, I love for my story or characters to take off in directions that surprise even me. I steal every free minute I can to write and often write outside my home, where I get a lot more accomplished and drink wonderful coffee. I also tend to eat a lot of chocolate while I’m writing.

SJ: Are you a meticulous planner or do you believe in the muse? Where do your ideas come from? Do they filter in through your dreams? Do they show up at inopportune times and whap you upside the head? Do they result in a shady deal with a dark power?

AH: I truly believe in the muse, with enough planning, research, and craft to back it up. My first book came from an experience I had with a friend, while the second one came from a dream. The ideas haunt me until I write them

SJ: What’s the book/story that’s closest to your heart? Is there a piece that you clearly feel is a piece of you? Do you play favorites?

AH: The book that’s closest to my heart at the moment is the one I just completed, called Always with You. It just started writing itself. The protagonist, Cathy, told me her story. I find at times I am overwhelmingly sad or touched by the narrative. I hope I can touch readers with this book as much as it’s touched me. On the other hand, The Guestbook, for me, was a total sensual escape into a beautiful setting, wonderful food, and romantic love. Who wouldn’t want to go there?

 SJ: If you could only write one genre ever again upon pain of being sacrificed to Cthulhu, what would it be and why?

AH: Women’s fiction. It’s the genre that motivates me the most, both reading and writing. It also has such a diversity to it, from literary to romance

SJ: What’s your biggest frustration as a writer? What do you consider the downside, or is there one? Is there any cliché that makes you want to wring people’s necks?

AH: Not having enough time. With having to run a literary agency and a consulting business, I have trouble finding time to write my own books. The downside of writing is that you have to share it with someone else, which can be a vulnerable and painful experience.

SJ:If you had to be stuck in one of your own books/stories for the rest of your life, what would it be and why? If you had to stick a loved one in one of your own books, what would it be and why? An enemy?

AH: I’d be happy being stuck in The Guestbook as Lily, with her beautiful home, adoring husband, wonderful friends, and great food.

SJ:Do you think it’s possible to develop a sure-fire recipe/formula for success as a writer? Would you want to, or does that compromise the art or the fun of it?

AH: Absolutely not. There is no one formula that works for everyone. I also think success is very subjective. Sometimes just having someone write me about how much my book touched them is worth all the money. That said, it would be nice to have a sure-fire recipe for getting my book out to its audience, widespread.

SJ: Everyone has words of wisdom for young writers, so I’m not going to ask you about that. With a few unknown writers becoming success stories, a lot of people seem to think it’s an easy career choice. What would your words of wisdom be to these people?

AH: Writing is probably one of the hardest career choices and least likely for someone to make money and be successful at. Write for a joy of it and the pleasure of sharing your story with others. You can hope for success and desire to be a bestseller, but know in the end it is a long journey and if your heart is not in it, you’ll never see the finish line.
SJ: It seems like everyone likes to gang up on certain genres as being inferior, less meaningful, or cheap entertainment (especially if it’s speculative in nature). Make a case for the genre you write.

AH: First of all, I don’t see any genre as being inferior. If a book entertains a reader—brings hope, joy, escape, makes their life easier, makes them laugh, or just plain entertains—that is enough. I know that not everyone reads the genre I write in, nor will they enjoy them. However, I also know there are many people who respond to love stories and books that take them on a journey to another place, another time, and touch their heart.

  SJ: What do you want people to instantly think of when they hear your name or your work mentioned?

AH: I want people to think that my books will make them feel, make them think, and ask questions about life and love.

SJ: Please tell us about your latest/favorite work or a little bit about what you’re working on right now. It’s plug time, so go for it!

AH:  My new book, Always with You, takes place on the Russian River in 1977 Northern California. It has been extremely compelling to write and has been a great emotional journey. I’m excited to be able to share it.

I have also begun working on the sequel to The Guestbook, which is called Tea and Comfort. At this point, I have my characters, setting, and plot down, but I need to do more research to really pull the novel together.

In the first book, there are three women that become close friends: Lily, Kayla, and Jude. The Guestbook features Lily and her inheriting the bed and breakfast and leaving a troubled marriage to follow her passion and find herself. Tea and Comfort features Kayla, the owner of the local herb and tea shop. It will uncover her mysterious background. Without giving away too much from the first book, it deals with why she made the decisions she has in the past and her deciding whether she can love again.

 

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When not visiting local farmer’s markets or indulging her love for chocolate, Andrea Hurst is an author and literary agent. Her passion for books drives her to find and write stories that take readers on a journey to another place and leave them with an unforgettable impression. She is a developmental editor for publishers and authors, an instructor in creative writing at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts, and a webinar presenter for Writers Digest. She lives with her dachshunds in the Pacific Northwest, on an island much like the fictional Madrona, with all of its natural beauty and small town charm. Her published books include The Lazy Dog’s Guide to Enlightenment and Everybody’s Natural Food Cookbook, and she co-authored A Book of Miracles. To learn more about Andrea and her books, visit http://www.AndreaHurst-author.com or http://www.andreahurst.com.

Website: http://andreahurst-author.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/andreahurstauthor

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/andreahurst_

Goodreads:  http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6553580.Andrea_Hurst

Book on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16086669-the-guestbook

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/The-Guestbook-Andrea-Hurst/dp/1478163143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361821429&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Guestbook+by+Andrea+Hurst